Sunday, December 30, 2012

Project HAARP Dangers & Mind Control

Lecturer and author Dr. Nick Begich discussed Project HAARP, and whether it's capable of affecting the climate or causing earthquakes, as well as updates on mind control and brain altering/enhancing technologies. "Mind effects are one of the most fertile grounds for military planners. It is one of the biggest areas of research in terms of trying to figure out, manipulate, mold, shape, and form the mind," he noted. While DARPA serves as the lead, almost every branch of the US military explores this kind of technology, he continued.

"Electronic telepathy is just a synthetic version of what is the natural radio of human beings, if you will...each of us is a transceiver and a transducer, we're picking up energy, we're transferring energy," and that's why telepathy, energy medicine, and higher human capacities are all associated with changes in energy states, Begich commented. But, a mental background of fear and anxiety will prevent people from experiencing higher states of consciousness, he pointed out.

HAARP is an array of antennas in Alaska, and by firing radio frequencies through them, a number of effects can be created such as altering the ionosphere. Begich reported that the secretive program is still active, contrary to rumors that it had closed down. It's possible HAARP technology could be used for manipulation of weather for control of a battlefield, creating what appears to be natural disasters, as well as earthquake generation using a small amount of energy to trigger a much larger reaction, he detailed. The earth-penetrating tomography function of HAARP uses a pulse rate that correlates to the rhythms of the human brain, which suggests that mind control/influence could be done over a large area through the atmosphere, he added.


Dr. Nick Begich is well known for his work and research on HAARP, "Mind Effects" and more. He has widely reported in these areas as an expert for many publications, government organizations and private companies. He has been an expert witness for the European Parliament on these subjects and provides significant research contributions in this area. Also, through the Lay Institute on Technologies he organized a private meeting of top scientists in the area of mind effects in 2007.

Begich has authored five books in seven languages on technology and the impacts of change. Heard on thousands of radio and television talk shows and documentaries, he is a frequent commentator on new technologies, energy, politics, education and the environment.

HAARP is the subject of numerous conspiracy theories. Various individuals have speculated hidden motives and capabilities to the project, and have blamed it for triggering catastrophes such as floods, droughts, hurricanes, thunderstorms, earthquakes in Pakistan, Haiti and the Philippines, major power outages, the downing of TWA Flight 800, Gulf War syndrome, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Allegations include the following: A Russian military journal wrote that ionospheric testing would "trigger a cascade of electrons that could flip earth's magnetic poles". The European Parliament and the Alaska state legislature held hearings about HAARP, the former citing "environmental concerns". Author of the self-published Angels Don't Play This HAARP, Nick Begich has told lecture audiences that HAARP could trigger earthquakes and turn the upper atmosphere into a giant lens so that "the sky would literally appear to burn". Former Governor of Minnesota and noted conspiracy theorist Jesse Ventura questioned whether the government is using the site to manipulate the weather or to bombard people with mind-controlling radio waves. An Air Force spokeswoman said Ventura made an official request to visit the research station but was rejected-"he and his crew showed up at HAARP anyway and were denied access". Physicist Bernard Eastlund claimed that HAARP includes technology based on his own patents that has the capability to modify weather and neutralize satellites.

Stanford University professor Umran Inan told Popular Science that weather-control conspiracy theories were "completely uninformed," explaining that "there's absolutely nothing we can do to disturb the Earth's [weather] systems. Even though the power HAARP radiates is very large, it's minuscule compared with the power of a lightning flash—and there are 50 to 100 lightning flashes every second. HAARP's intensity is very small."

Computer scientist David Naiditch characterizes HAARP as "a magnet for conspiracy theorists", saying that HAARP attracts their attention because "its purpose seems deeply mysterious to the scientifically uninformed". Journalist Sharon Weinberger called HAARP "the Moby Dick of conspiracy theories" and said the popularity of conspiracy theories often overshadows the benefits HAARP may provide to the scientific community.