Wednesday, June 19, 2013

How to Stay ANONYMOUS & Get OFF THE GRID - STOP the U.S. Government from TRACKING your LIFE





How to Stay ANONYMOUS & Get OFF THE GRID - STOP the U.S. Government from TRACKING your LIFE

How to Evade Government Surveillance and Stay Anonymous Online

Why stay anonymous online? In today's society there are people and automated devices that are recording your deepest, most private thoughts and activities. Each day we voluntarily divulge the most intimate details of our lives through social networking accounts, email, banking apps, online games and more. In addition, governments and corporations can censor and block our traffic based on whatever standards are in place that day.

Government agencies, hackers and sophisticated bot networks are capturing every piece of digital data that we transmit through all of our Internet-connected gadgets. Smartphones, Smart TVs, computers, tablets, and so much more...they are all vulnerable, nothing is safe these days. Even your old clam-shell phone isn't safe. This is because many phone providers route your calls over media using the Internet Protocol at some point within their network. For example, long distance providers transfer calls over VoIP all the time.

Whether you're browsing the Web, signing up for a new online game, or simply checking your email, you are constantly leaving tracks and giving away information to anyone with access and the knowledge to analyze the traffic. Once the data is compiled the attacker can build an incredibly accurate profile of not only your online life but your real-world life as well.

So, the big question is, how can you stay anonymous online? Free from government censorship and potential eavesdropping from some hacker or three-letter government agency that wants to invade your privacy while you use your computer. In comes Whonix, the Anonymous Operating System!

Use Whonix, The Anonymous Operating System, Stay Anonymous Online

Whonix is a free, general purpose computer operating system based on Virtual Box, Linux and Tor. The purpose of Whonix is to allow Internet users the ability to stay anonymous online. This is most beneficial to users in regimes that censor and monitor access to the Internet, but it can also be used by anyone who values their privacy, or doesn't want their activities tracked online.
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By design, IP address leaks are meant to be impossible while using Whonix. The developers claim even malware with admin privileges can't find the Whonix Workstation's real IP address or location. This is because Whonix consists of two (virtual) computers. One machine acts as a gateway or router and runs only Tor, a sophisticated anonymity software. This machine is called the Whonix-Gateway. The other machine, which called the Whonix-Workstation, is on a completely isolated network that only allows Internet connections to be routed through the Whonix-Gateway.
Prism NSA FBI
Apple, Facebook and Google were among nine tech firms named as having participated (wittingly or unwittingly) in the controversial NSA PRISM we surveillance programme. The 41-page presentation was given in April this year and made public by the Washington Post.

The Apple statement, although it reveals the number of requests Cupertino complied with, it continues to deny allowing gov bods to access its servers, stating: "We first heard of the government's 'Prism' program when news organizations asked us about it on June 6."

Since the exposure of the programme through the actions of former CIA contractor Edward Snowden, US tech firms have been lobbying the government to allow them to provide more details to their customers on the extent to which they have helped the authorities with their inquiries. Spy chiefs were against this disclosure but politicians appear to have overruled them and allowed tech giants to provide more details on wiretap requests than had been permitted with previous transparency reports from the likes of Google and Microsoft.

This move is clearly designed, at least in part, to reassure businesses and consumers that data held by US technology firms is not subject to dragnet surveillance, a concern that might prompt enterprises and international consumers to look for alternatives to US-based services.