Tuesday, July 16, 2013

A War is Coming that will Kill 2.3 Billion Human Beings





Founder of End Time Ministries, Rev. Irvin Baxter, discussed biblical prophecy, and why he believes many signs are in place that were foretold in the Book of Revelation. "A war is coming that will kill 1/3 of mankind-- 2.3 billion human beings," he warned, adding that the Bible says that the war will start from the Euphrates River (which runs through Turkey, Syria, Iran, and Iraq, countries that currently have much tension). "I will be shocked if we don't see this war in 2013, but that's not a prediction, because I don't know," he declared. In the event of such a catastrophic war, the surviving populace might be willing to accept a microchip implant in the name of a security, Baxter noted, and this would likely be the prophesied "Mark of the Beast" (view related video clip).

Baxter believes that the Antichrist is alive now, and that he will eventually be possessed by Satan. He will then try to realize his ambition-- having everyone on Earth worship him through forcing them to pledge their allegiance to him or they won't be able to buy or sell-- "that's what the Mark of the Beast is all about," he said. Whoever is the Pope during the time of the Antichrist will be known as the "False Prophet," the last Pope, he continued.

During the time of the Antichrist, there'll be a one-world government, one-world religion, and one-world economy-- this "Master Plan of the Dragon" was launched 100 years ago with the start of the Federal Reserve, Baxter stated. He also spoke about how current events could be strong indicators of prophecy, such as turmoil in the Middle East, as well as his planned Jerusalem Prophecy College.

Biography:

Irvin Baxter Jr. is the editor of the most widely circulated prophecy magazine in the world, hosts the daily radio broadcast, Politics and Relgion, and is the author of several prophecy books and Bible studies.He founded Endtime, a non-profit corporation.

Before committing himself to full-time work with Endtime Ministries, Irvin Baxter, Jr. served as pastor of the Oak Park Church in Richmond, Indiana for approximately 32 years.In November of 2005, Endtime Ministries moved from Richmond, Indiana to Garland, Texas. In addition to Endtime Magazine and Politics and Religion, Endtime Ministries produces numerous Bible Study resources and sponsors prophecy conferences and Bible studies throughout the world.

Wikipedia
The Book of Revelation, often simply known as Revelation or by a number of variants expanding upon its authorship or subject matter, is the final book of the New Testament and occupies a central part in Christian eschatology. Written in Koine Greek, its title is derived from the first word of the text, apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation". The author of the work identifies himself in the text as "John" and says that he was on Patmos, an island in the Aegean, when he "heard a great voice" instructing him to write the book. This John is traditionally supposed to be John the Apostle, although recent scholarship has suggested other possibilities including a putative figure given the name John of Patmos. Most modern scholars believe it was written around 95 AD, with some believing it dates from around 70 AD.

The book spans three literary genres: epistolary, apocalyptic, and prophetic. It begins with an epistolary address to the reader followed by an apocalyptic description of a complex series of events derived from prophetic visions which the author claims to have seen. These include the appearance of a number of figures and images which have become important in Christian eschatology, such as the Whore of Babylon and the Beast, and culminate in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. The obscure and extravagant[1] imagery has led to a wide variety of interpretations: historicist interpretations see in Revelation a broad view of history; preterist interpretations treat Revelation as mostly referring to the events of the apostolic era (1st century), or—at the latest—the fall of the Roman Empire; futurists believe that Revelation describes future events; and idealist or symbolic interpretations consider that Revelation does not refer to actual people or events, but is an allegory of the spiritual path and the ongoing struggle between good and evil.

The Book of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament canon, though there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles.