Friday, July 19, 2013

Neo-SURVIVALISM ~ Preparing for Disasters with Mat Stein




Author Mat Stein discussed what individuals can do to prepare for disaster scenarios and unexpected disruptions, such as what might occur during a terrorist attack. For short-term emergencies, he stressed the importance of having a 'Grab-and-Run Kit', which would include basic survival items for a period of up to three days. Water is crucial, and one should have purification chemicals and/or filters, he said. A Colloidal Silver generator would also be useful-- the silver particles can act as an antibiotic and kill pathogens, he noted.

Stein argued for sustainability practices such as growing and preparing your own food. Wheat seeds can be sprouted to make Essene bread. In terms of storing food, canned and dried supplies have different shelf lives, and should be rotated to keep fresh, he advised.

He also spoke about the value of tapping into your intuition in dire circumstances where decisions need to be made. In his "Pit of the Stomach exercise," he suggested that people take a few deep breaths until relaxed, then picture in their mind each alternative or choice. The best option will have a more relaxed feeling in the solar plexus region; the worst option will feel tight in this area, he explained.
SURVIVALISM

Wikipedia
Survivalism is a movement of individuals or groups (called survivalists or preppers) who are actively preparing for emergencies as well as possible disruptions in social or political order, on scales ranging from local to international. Survivalists often have emergency medical and self-defence training, stockpile food and water, prepare for self-sufficiency, and build structures that will help them survive or "disappear" (e.g. a survival retreat or underground shelter).

Anticipated disruptions include the following: Clusters of natural disasters, patterns of apocalyptic planetary crises, or Earth Changes (tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, blizzards, solar storms, severe thunderstorms). A disaster caused by the activities of humankind (chemical spills, release of radioactive materials, nuclear or conventional war, oppressive governments). The general collapse of society caused by the shortage or unavailability of resources such as electricity, fuel, food, or water. Financial disruption or economic collapse (caused by monetary manipulation, hyperinflation, deflation, or depression). A global pandemic. Widespread chaos or some other unexplained apocalyptic event.

Mainstream emergency preparations

People who are not part of survivalist groups or apolitically oriented religious groups also make preparations for emergencies. This can include (depending on the location) preparing for earthquakes, floods, power outages, blizzards, avalanches, wildfires, terrorist attacks, nuclear power plant accidents, hazardous material spills, tornadoes, and hurricanes. These preparations can be as simple as following Red Cross and U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommendations by keeping a first aid kit, shovel, and extra clothes in the car, or by maintaining a small kit of emergency supplies, containing emergency food, water, a space blanket, and other essentials.

The advent of H1N1 Swine Flu in 2009 piqued interest in survivalism, significantly boosting sales of preparedness books and making survivalism more mainstream.[23] Events such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake, the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami have revitalized the survivalist community.

These developments led Gerald Celente, founder of the Trends Research Institute, to identify a trend that he calls "Neo-Survivalism". He explained this phenomenon in a radio interview with Jim Puplava on December 18, 2009:

When Disaster Strikes: A Comprehensive Guide for Emergency Planning and Crisis Survival , When Technology Fails: A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency, 2nd Edition Matthew Stein